2016 When Work Works Awards Honor Companies that Excel at Creating Effective Workplaces

Work/life fit policies, flexible scheduling and transition to parenthood programs among practices in place at award-winning companies

Software Technology Group was one of only 6 recipients in Utah to receive this prestigious award.

NEW YORK, May 24, 2016 – More than 300 workplaces of all sizes and across various industries are being honored as winners of the 2016 When Work Works Awards, the Families and Work Institute (FWI) and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) announced today.

The awards honor organizations that have created effective workplaces based on six evidence-based components that are linked with positive employee and employer outcomes: autonomy; work/life fit; supervisor support for work success; satisfaction with earnings, benefits and opportunities for advancement; opportunities for learning; and a culture of trust.

A total of 351 workplaces from across the country won awards this year. The winners are a diverse group. Some operate from a single office with a staff of 10, while others are large organizations with thousands of employees. They represent 43 states and the District of Columbia.

“These employers have excelled at creating effective workplaces yielding tremendously positive results for business success, as well as for their employees’ well-being and productivity,” said Ellen Galinsky, president of FWI. “Effective workplaces recognize that employees are an organization’s greatest resource and make a critical difference in the organization’s ability to not only survive, but to thrive.”

The When Work Works Awards are unique for their rigorous, two-step selection process, which involves an evaluation of employers’ flexibility programs and practices and a confidential employee survey on the key ingredients of an effective and flexible workplace. The award also examines the real-life experiences of employees at their worksites as opposed to companywide policies. All applicants are measured against national norms from two representative studies—the National Study of Employers and the National Study of the Changing Workforce.